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Colorectal Education

When diagnosed with a certain medical condition, finding useful, reliable and understandable information is not always easy. That's why we have included extra information that will hopefully address your specific questions and concerns.

On the various links below, you will find information from actual patients, da Vinci surgeons, the media and our own experts. We hope this helps you to make an informed decision about your healthcare needs.

Links & Resources

National Cancer Institute:

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/colon-and-rectal

The National Cancer Institute website includes significant information about cancer and the research being done at the Institute. The National Cancer Institute's research programs are extensive and contain many innovative initiatives. You will also find valuable cancer-related information of all kinds. For the general public, patients, and health professionals, NCI offers consumer-oriented information on a wide range of topics as well as comprehensive descriptions of its research programs and clinical trials.

Health Well

http://www.healingwell.com/

Health Well is a thriving community and information resource for patients, caregivers, and families coping with diseases, disorders and chronic illness. HealingWell.com features health articles, medical news, video webcasts, community message boards and chat rooms, clinical healthcare resources, email, newsletters, books and reviews, and resource link directories on a wide range of diseases, disorders and chronic illness.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

http://www.cdc.gov

The CDC is a government agency committed to programs that reduce the health and economic consequences of the leading causes of death and disability.

American Cancer Society

http://search.cancer.org/search?client=amcancer&site=amcancer&output=xml_no_dtd&proxystylesheet=amcancer&q=colorectal

The American Cancer Society (ACS) is a nationwide, community-based voluntary health organization. The ACS has state divisions and more than 3,400 local offices.

MedLine Plus

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/da-vinci-colorectalcancer.html

MedlinePlus will direct you to information to help answer health questions with authoritative information from NLM, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other government agencies and health-related organizations. MedlinePlus also has extensive information about drugs, an illustrated medical encyclopedia, interactive patient tutorials, and latest health news.

SAGES

http://www.sages.org/publications/patient_information/

The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) represents a worldwide community of surgeons that can bring minimal access surgery, endoscopy and emerging techniques to patients in every country.

ASCRSP

http://www.fascrs.org/patients/

In a continuing effort to provide patients and the public with up-to-date and useful information about diseases of the colon, rectum and anus, The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRSP) offers a variety of educational materials and informational brochures.


All surgery presents risk, including da Vinci Surgery. Results, including cosmetic results, may vary. Serious complications may occur in any surgery, up to and including death. Examples of serious and life-threatening complications, which may require hospitalization, include injury to tissues or organs; bleeding; infection, and internal scarring that can cause long-lasting dysfunction or pain. Temporary pain or nerve injury has been linked to the inverted position often used during abdominal and pelvic surgery. Patients should understand that risks of surgery include potential for human error and potential for equipment failure. Risk specific to minimally invasive surgery may include: a longer operative time; the need to convert the procedure to an open approach; or the need for additional or larger incision sites. Converting the procedure to open could mean a longer operative time, long time under anesthesia, and could lead to increased complications. Research suggests that there may be an increased risk of incision-site hernia with single-incision surgery. Patients who bleed easily, have abnormal blood clotting, are pregnant or morbidly obese are typically not candidates for minimally invasive surgery, including da Vinci Surgery. Other surgical approaches are available. Patients should review the risks associated with all surgical approaches. They should talk to their doctors about their surgical experience and to decide if da Vinci is right for them. For more complete information on surgical risks, safety and indications for use, please refer to http://www.davincisurgery.com/da-vinci-surgery/safety-information.php.

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